Maryland Developer Declaration Does Not Establish Assessment Lien

A developer’s Declaration notifies the purchaser of the property of a potential lien for unpaid assessments, but is not sufficient to create an assessment lien, according to a recent decision of the Maryland Court of Appeals–the top state appeals court.  A lien based on the contractual obligation to pay assessments is valid only if the party asserting the lien complies with the notice procedures of the Maryland Contract Lien Act.

At issue, in Select Portfolio Servicing, Inc. v. Saddlebrook West Utility Company, LLC, was a claimed lien as part of a deferred financing arrangement for the construction of the water and sewer infrastructure for a new home development in Prince George’s County, Maryland.  Continue reading

HOT TOPICS IN COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION GOVERNANCE!

Fair Housing, Assessment Collection, and Governing Documents are the featured topics at a FREE educational event for board members and managers presented by Thomas Schild Law Group.

Keep current on legal news and trends which affect condominium associations, homeowners, and housing cooperatives in Maryland and the District of Columbia by attending HOT TOPICS IN COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION GOVERNANCE on Saturday August 26, 2017 in Rockville, Maryland.

Attorneys Thomas Schild, Scott Silverman, and John Tsikerdanos will highlight recent court decisions, laws and federal regulations which impact the governance of every community association!  Sessions include:

>>> Understanding and Amending the Governing Documents

>>> Show Me the Money–Tips for Collecting Delinquent Assessments

>>> Avoiding Fair Housing Harassment and Accommodation Claims

Advance Registration is REQUIRED–Seating is Limited.

REGISTER NOW.

 

Posted by Thomas Schild Law Group, LLC, attorneys for condominiums, homeowner associations and housing cooperatives in Maryland–including Montgomery County, Prince George’s County, Howard County, Frederick County, and Baltimore County; and in Baltimore City and  Washington, D.C.

 

 

 

Maryland Makes it Easier to Amend Condo Bylaws and HOA Covenants

Changes to the Maryland Condominium Act and Maryland Homeowners Association Act will soon make it easier to amend the governing documents of condominiums and homeowner associations.

The new law allows amendments to be made by a vote of members “in good standing” instead of all of the owners.  An owner is not in good standing if the payment of assessments or other charges is in arrears for more than 90 days.

Additionally, the votes required to approve amendments to condo bylaws and the declaration and bylaws of a homeowner association is reduced to 60 percent, or such lower amount allowed by the association governing documents, beginning October 1, 2017.  Continue reading

2017 Maryland Condo and HOA Legislation–The Final Score

During the 2017 Maryland legislative session, the General Assembly considered many bills regarding condominium and homeowner association governance, foreclosure procedures, state registration of community associations, and regulation of community association managers.

Legislation passed includes bills to make it easier to amend condo bylaws and an HOA declaration; require lender notice of foreclosure sale postponement and cancellation; and require community associations to provide owner notice of common property sales, including government tax sales. Continue reading

Maryland Top Court to Review Condo Towing Rule

To tow or not to tow…with apologies to William Shakespeare, that is the question at the heart of long-running litigation between an Anne Arundel County condominium and owners whose vehicles were towed from the condo parking lot.  The Maryland Court of Appeals will soon resolve the dispute over a condominium association’s authority to suspend a condo owner’s use of the common elements when the owner is in arrears in payment of condominium assessments. Continue reading

2016 Maryland Condo & HOA Legislative Scorecard

The Maryland legislature has passed legislation which affects the management and operation of condominiums and homeowner associations.  New laws which take effect October 1, 2016 include:

Resale Disclosures.   Homeowner associations will be required for the first time to provide resale disclosure information to an owner selling a home in an HOA.  For condos which have long been required to provide resale disclosures, the disclosure requirements have been clarified or changed on matters such as assessments, replacement reserves, pending litigation, unit alterations, and violations of health or building codes.  And, the amount which condos, HOAs and management companies may charge for providing resale disclosure information is capped by the new law.

Tax Sale Procedure.  The purchaser of property at a tax sale will be required to notify condos and HOAs when a court suit is filed to prevent owners of property in those communities from keeping ownership of property.  The new law also provides that when a tax sale is approved by the court,  the tax sale purchaser is responsible for payment of condominium and homeowner association assessments from the date of the court judgment, whether or not a tax sale deed to the property is recorded in the land records.

Assessment Collection.  A court suit will not be permitted for any unpaid assessments where the time for filing suit has expired. Any subsequent payment on the debt, or written or oral affirmation of the debt will not revive or extend the statute of limitations. This applies to all suits involving consumer debt, not just association assessments.

Home Gambling.  Card games and mah jong games hosted in a residence not more than once a week will now be allowed where the total gambling bets for all players is no more than $1,000 in a 24-hour period.  In senior communities with age 55 restrictions, these games will also be allowed in the common areas.

Legislation considered but not enacted would have required state registration of all condos, co-ops and HOAs, and would have made it easier to amend association governing documents by allowing an owner’s failure to vote on a proposed amendment to be counted as that owner’s approval of the proposed amendment.

Also rejected was a bill to prohibit provisions in condominium sales contracts and bylaws which limit the ability of condo associations to file suit to enforce construction warranties on the common elements.

Posted by: Thomas Schild Law Group, LLC, attorneys for condominiums, homeowner associations, and housing cooperatives in Maryland and Washington, D.C.

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