Short Term Rentals Coming Soon to Montgomery County, Maryland

Short term rentals will soon be allowed in all residential areas of Montgomery County, Maryland.  A home rented on a daily or weekly basis is often referred to as an AirBnb–which is the dominant online booking web site for short term rentals.

Under current law, no residential rentals are permitted in Montgomery County for less than 30 days.  Faced with widespread illegal daily and weekly rentals, the County Council passed legislation in October, 2017 to allow these rentals where the property is the primary residence of the owner or owner-authorized resident of the rental property. However, condominiums, homeowner associations and housing cooperatives will still be allowed to ban or restrict short term rentals.  Continue reading

2017 Maryland Condo and HOA Legislation–The Final Score

During the 2017 Maryland legislative session, the General Assembly considered many bills regarding condominium and homeowner association governance, foreclosure procedures, state registration of community associations, and regulation of community association managers.

Legislation passed includes bills to make it easier to amend condo bylaws and an HOA declaration; require lender notice of foreclosure sale postponement and cancellation; and require community associations to provide owner notice of common property sales, including government tax sales. Continue reading

Will Community Associations Get Trumped?

The election of Donald Trump as the President of the United States ushers in uncertainty for a variety of federal housing policies which affect the financing and governance of homes in community associations–condominiums, homeowner associations and housing cooperatives.  During the election campaign, Trump said little about the federal role in promoting homeownership.

But, his support for reduced government regulation and the 2016 Republican Platform provide clues about how a Trump Administration may impact community associations. Continue reading

Board Training Required for Condo and HOA Association Directors

Mid-way through 2016, hundreds of directors of condos, HOAs and coops in Montgomery County, Maryland have successfully completed the online training program now required by County law for directors elected, re-elected or appointed since January 1.  The training program, Community Governance Fundamentals, is provided by the Montgomery County Commission on Common Ownership Communities (CCOC).

The required education program is intended to promote more knowledgeable and responsible management of common ownership communities.  Topics include the roles and responsibilities of board members and homeowners, community governing documents, financial management, meeting procedures, and covenant and rule enforcement procedures.

The online training takes about 2 hours to complete, may be taken in phases over time, is interactive and includes short quizzes which must be passed to move on to the next section.  The program is also offered in a live format by community association attorneys and managers in conjunction with the Community Associations Institute.

A director who does not complete the training is not prohibited from continuing to serve on the board.  However, a CCOC dispute resolution panel may consider failure to complete the training in deciding a dispute between the association and a homeowner.

There are more than 1,000 common ownership communities in Montgomery County, which include over 130,000 dwelling units and 5,000 board members.

Posted by:  Thomas Schild Law Group, LLC, attorneys for Maryland condominiums, homeowner associations, and housing cooperatives in Montgomery County, Prince George’s County, Howard County and Frederick County.

Montgomery Commission on Common Ownership Communities Under Review

Changes to the operation, composition and dispute resolution process of the Montgomery County Commission on Common Ownership Communities (CCOC) are under review by the Montgomery County Council.

Since 1991, the CCOC has been an information resource for residents and leaders of condominiums, homeowner associations, and housing cooperatives in Montgomery County, Maryland.  And, its mediation and arbitration program has offered a way of resolving disputes between homeowners and associations regarding matters such as association governance procedures, owner architectural changes, and the authority of the association board of directors.

Montgomery County has experienced significant growth in common ownership communities in the 25 years since the CCOC was established.  There are currently over 1,000 condominium, homeowners association, and co-operative communities with approximately 340,000 residents.

Legislation proposed by the County Executive would require mediation of certain disputes regarding common ownership communities and would require that all members of a dispute resolution hearing panel be members of the CCOC.  Currently, mediation is voluntary and the hearing panels are chaired by an attorney volunteer who is not a member of the CCOC.

Additionally, the proposed legislation (County Council Bill No. 50-15)  would change the composition for the CCOC membership to include 5 members of the public who are not owners or residents in a common ownership community or affiliated with professions associated with these communities.  Currently, the 15-member Commission is comprised of 8 members who are owners or residents and 7 members who are members of professions associated with common ownership communities (such as managers, attorneys, real estate agents, and developers).  The bill would also change the government agency responsible for providing staff and other support from the Office of Consumer Protection to the Department of Housing and Community Affairs.

The County Executive requested these changes in response to a report of the Council’s Office of Legislative Oversight regarding CCOC operations and a ruling of the County Ethics Commission regarding volunteer attorney hearing panel chairs who represent associations or homeowners before the CCOC for compensation on other matters.

The CCOC opposes the legislation and instead proposes that a work group which includes CCOC members be convened to provide recommendations to the County Executive and County Council before any statutory changes  are made.

Posted by: Thomas Schild Law Group, LLC, attorneys for condominiums, homeowner associations, and housing cooperatives in Maryland and Washington, D.C.

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Maryland Condo and HOA Legislative Hot Topics for 2016

With the Maryland legislature in the midst of its 2016 session which runs to mid-April, several bills which would affect condomium and homeowner association operations are now being considered by House and Senate legislative committees of the Maryland General Assembly.

Resale Disclosures

Legislation concerning resale disclosures would cap the amount which an association or it management company could charge an owner for providing the governing documents and other information  in connection the sale of the owner’s home. As introduced, the bill would limit the basic charge to $250 and allow additional charges of $100 to inspect the property for covenant violations and up to $100 for providing an expedited response to a request for resale disclosures.

Condo associations have long  been required to provide resale disclosure information.   If enacted, the bill would create a new obligation for a homeowners association to provide resale disclosure information to an owner who is selling a home in an HOA.

Condominium Construction Warranty

Also under review is legislation to amend the Maryland Condominium Act to prevent developers of residential condominiums from including provisions in sales contracts and condo governing documents which limit the ability of condominium associations to file suit to enforce construction warranties for the condominium common elements.

Among the provisions which the warranty bill would prohibit are those which purport to shorten the statute of limitations applicable to any legal claims; waive the “discovery rule” or other accrual date applicable to claims; and prevent a condo association from bringing claims on behalf of two or more unit owners.  It would also disallow developer-imposed requirements that as condo association obtain the approval of unit owners, the developer or others as a condition to commencing mediation, arbitration or litigation on behalf of the condo association.

Annual State Registration

Legislation has also been introduced which would require annual state registration of all condos, HOAs and coops and require associations to  provide contact information for the association board members and any management company and attorney.employed by the association.  It would also require information regarding the number and type of residential units,  fidelity insurance, replacement reserves, grievance procedures and any other information required by the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation.

Amendment of Governing Documents

A bill to make it easier to  amend the declaration, bylaws and other governing documents of condos and HOAs has also been introduced.  It would allow an amendment by a vote of owners in “good standing” which includes only owners who are not more than  3 months in arrears in payment of association assessments and have satisfied other requirements of the bylaws.  An amendment could be passed by  two-thirds of the total votes of owners in good standing, or by a lower percentage if required in the governing document. The legislation would also allow an owner’s failure to vote to be counted as that owner’s approval of the proposed amendment.

As of mid-February 2016, these bills are under review by House and Senate legislative committees and have not been enacted..

Posted byThomas Schild Law Group, LLC, attorneys for condominiums, homeowner associations, and housing cooperatives in Maryland and Washington, D.C.

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