Condominium Owner Negligence Bars Claim Against Contractor

Where a condominium unit in Baltimore County, Maryland was damaged by steam escaping from the heating system when a unit owner hired a plumber to remove heat radiators in the unit  and was negligent by not requesting the contractor to re-install  the radiators after the unit was painted, the condo insurance carrier may not recover the cost to repair the unit from the plumbing contractor, a federal trial court in Maryland recently ruled.

The radiators were removed in July when the central heating system was not operating, and the unit owner did not request the contractor to re-install the radiators until November after the heating system had been tuned on. The cost of more than $120,000 to repair the damage to the unit was covered by the condominium’s property damage insurance.  The insurance company paid the condominium association which then paid the unit owner who hired a contractor to make the repairs to the unit.

The insurance carrier filed suit against the plumbing contractor to recover the amount it paid to the condominium.  The contractor contended that the claim should not be allowed because the unit owner was an insured under the condo master insurance policy and was negligent in not contacting the contractor to re-install the radiators. Continue reading

Maryland General Assembly OKs Bill to Help Condos Collect Delinquent Assessments

The Maryland General Assembly has approved legislation to make it easier for condominium associations to suspend use of the common area parking lot, pool and other recreational amenities when an owner is delinquent in paying the condo assessments for more than 60 days.

The new law allows approval by owners with 60 percent of the total eligible votes to amend a condominium declaration to provide for the suspension of use of these portions of the condominium common property.  This is far less than the 80 percent minimum required by the Maryland Condominium Act for other declaration amendments, and some older condo documents require as much as 100 percent unanimous approval.  Continue reading

2017 Maryland Condo and HOA Legislation–The Final Score

During the 2017 Maryland legislative session, the General Assembly considered many bills regarding condominium and homeowner association governance, foreclosure procedures, state registration of community associations, and regulation of community association managers.

Legislation passed includes bills to make it easier to amend condo bylaws and an HOA declaration; require lender notice of foreclosure sale postponement and cancellation; and require community associations to provide owner notice of common property sales, including government tax sales. Continue reading

Maryland Top Court to Review Condo Towing Rule

To tow or not to tow…with apologies to William Shakespeare, that is the question at the heart of long-running litigation between an Anne Arundel County condominium and owners whose vehicles were towed from the condo parking lot.  The Maryland Court of Appeals will soon resolve the dispute over a condominium association’s authority to suspend a condo owner’s use of the common elements when the owner is in arrears in payment of condominium assessments. Continue reading

2016 Maryland Condo and HOA Legislation—What’s Hot and What’s Not

As the Maryland General Assembly heads to the end of the 2016 session on April 11, some bills regarding community association governance are still under consideration.  Others have been killed in committee.  To become law, a bill must be passed by the Maryland House and Senate and signed by the Governor.

Here’s What’s HOT!

Resale Disclosures. A bill to cap the amount which an association or management company can charge for providing resale disclosure information has passed the House and is headed to the Senate.  If enacted, it would also create a new obligation for homeowners associations to provide resale disclosure information to an owner selling  a home in an HOA.

Annual State Registration.  Legislation to require each condo, co-op and HOA to register with the state was passed by the House after it was scaled back to limit the information required.

Foreclosure and Tax Sale Notices.   Where condos and HOAs have recorded assessment liens, a bill passed by the House would require lenders to notify the association of any proposed, postponed or canceled foreclosure sale.  Another bill passed by the House and Senate would require tax sale purchasers to notify condos and HOAs when a court suit is filed to prevent owners of property in those communities from retaining ownership of property purchased at a tax sale.

 

….and Here’s What’s NOT!

Condo Construction Warranty.  House and Senate committees rejected proposed changes in the Maryland Condominium Act to prohibit provisions in condo sales contracts and bylaws which limit the ability of condo associations to file suit to enforce construction warranties.

Amendment of Governing Documents.   A House committee also killed legislation to make it easier to amend the governing documents of condos and HOAs by allowing an owner’s failure to vote on a proposed amendment to be counted as that owner’s approval of the proposed amendment.

 

 

Maryland Condo and HOA Legislative Hot Topics for 2016

With the Maryland legislature in the midst of its 2016 session which runs to mid-April, several bills which would affect condomium and homeowner association operations are now being considered by House and Senate legislative committees of the Maryland General Assembly.

Resale Disclosures

Legislation concerning resale disclosures would cap the amount which an association or it management company could charge an owner for providing the governing documents and other information  in connection the sale of the owner’s home. As introduced, the bill would limit the basic charge to $250 and allow additional charges of $100 to inspect the property for covenant violations and up to $100 for providing an expedited response to a request for resale disclosures.

Condo associations have long  been required to provide resale disclosure information.   If enacted, the bill would create a new obligation for a homeowners association to provide resale disclosure information to an owner who is selling a home in an HOA.

Condominium Construction Warranty

Also under review is legislation to amend the Maryland Condominium Act to prevent developers of residential condominiums from including provisions in sales contracts and condo governing documents which limit the ability of condominium associations to file suit to enforce construction warranties for the condominium common elements.

Among the provisions which the warranty bill would prohibit are those which purport to shorten the statute of limitations applicable to any legal claims; waive the “discovery rule” or other accrual date applicable to claims; and prevent a condo association from bringing claims on behalf of two or more unit owners.  It would also disallow developer-imposed requirements that as condo association obtain the approval of unit owners, the developer or others as a condition to commencing mediation, arbitration or litigation on behalf of the condo association.

Annual State Registration

Legislation has also been introduced which would require annual state registration of all condos, HOAs and coops and require associations to  provide contact information for the association board members and any management company and attorney.employed by the association.  It would also require information regarding the number and type of residential units,  fidelity insurance, replacement reserves, grievance procedures and any other information required by the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation.

Amendment of Governing Documents

A bill to make it easier to  amend the declaration, bylaws and other governing documents of condos and HOAs has also been introduced.  It would allow an amendment by a vote of owners in “good standing” which includes only owners who are not more than  3 months in arrears in payment of association assessments and have satisfied other requirements of the bylaws.  An amendment could be passed by  two-thirds of the total votes of owners in good standing, or by a lower percentage if required in the governing document. The legislation would also allow an owner’s failure to vote to be counted as that owner’s approval of the proposed amendment.

As of mid-February 2016, these bills are under review by House and Senate legislative committees and have not been enacted..

Posted byThomas Schild Law Group, LLC, attorneys for condominiums, homeowner associations, and housing cooperatives in Maryland and Washington, D.C.

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