Maryland Eases Hurdle to Amending Condo and HOA Covenants

The governing documents of Maryland condominiums and homeowner associations often require that amendments to the governing documents must be approved by up to 100 percent of the lenders who hold the mortgage of homeowner’s property. The Maryland Condominium Act for several years has allowed lender approval of most condominium bylaw amendments to be presumed if a lender does not object to the amendment within 60 days.

A new Maryland law extends the presumed lender consent to amendments to a condominium declaration and to all governing documents of a homeowners association, including the declaration of covenants, bylaws, deed and agreement, and other recorded covenants and restrictions. The hurdle of obtaining lender approval has been eased for nearly all amendments to condominium and HOA covenants. The only exceptions are amendments which alter the priority of the mortgage lien; materially impair or affect an owner’s unit or lot as collateral; or materially impair or affect the right of the lender to exercise rights under the mortgage or law.

The presumed consent procedure requires the association to deliver the proposed amendment to each lender entitled to notice of the amendment. If the lender does not object in writing within 60 days of actual receipt of the proposed amendment, the lender is deemed to have consented to the amendment.

The new amendment procedure is included in the Maryland Condominium Act and Maryland Homeowners Association Act, effective October 1, 2020.

Separately, the Maryland Condominium Act insurance provisions were amended this year to allow a condominium to require a unit owner to pay the master insurance deductible amount up to $10,000 where the cause of damage originates in the owner’s condominium unit. This is increase from $5,000, beginning in October, 2020.

And, the Maryland Condominium Act and Maryland Homeowners Association Act were amended to require all Maryland condos and HOAs to submit the approved annual budget to all owners within 30 days after the meeting at which the budget was adopted. This is in addition to the requirement that the proposed annual budget be provided to owners at least 30 days before it is adopted. The budget information may be provided by email, posting on the association website or inclusion in the association newsletter.

Another new Maryland law requires all condominiums, housing cooperatives, and homeowner associations in Prince George’s County to obtain a replacement reserve study of the condition the common property every 5 years and include in the annual condominium fees a portion of the estimated future cost to repair and replace major components of the condominium.

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